Monday, 27 October 2014

福利國家的福利,全民退保!或你及家人有意移民!



楓葉國的全民退保,資料~~Canada Service 加國官方網站及小的現狀 

全民退保有二項,一是老人金及綜援,二是全民退休金。
第一項:老人金及綜援
Old Age Security pension and benefits - Monthly payment amounts and maximum annual income - October to December 2014
Your situation
Maximum monthly payment amount
Maximum annual income to receive the OAS pension Footnote 1
Regardless of your marital status
$563.74
$114,815 (individual income)
Old Age Security benefits
Guaranteed Income Supplement (GIS) amounts for individuals receiving a full Old Age Security (OAS) pension.
If you are a single, widowed or divorced pensioner
$764.40
$17,088 (individual income)
If your spouse/common-law partner receives the full OAS pension
$506.86
$22,560 (combined income)
If your spouse/common-law partner does not receive an OAS pension
$764.40
$40,944 (combined income)
If your spouse/common-law partner receives the Allowance
$506.86
$31,584 (combined income)
If your spouse/common-law partner receives the GIS and the full OAS pension
$1,070.60
$31,584 (combined income)
If you are a surviving spouse or common-law partner

老安按: $563.74 是以你是加國出生或居住至少四十年的正常金額,否則是以居住年期扣減,例:居住二十年,則為上述金額一半!


How the Old Age Security pension is calculated

The amount of your Old Age Security pension will be determined by how long you have lived in Canada after the age of 18, according to the following rules:

Full pension

You may qualify for a full Old Age Security pension in one of two ways:
  1. You resided in Canada for at least 40 years after turning age 18, or
  2. You were born on or before July 1, 1952, and
    • on July 1, 1977, you resided in Canada, or
    • on July 1, 1977, you did not reside in Canada but after turning 18, you did reside in Canada for a period of time, or
    • on July 1, 1977, you possessed a valid Canadian immigration visa.
      • In addition, you must have resided in Canada continuously for the 10 years immediately before the approval of your OAS pension. If you were absent from Canada during that 10-year period, you may still qualify for a full pension if:
        • you resided in Canada for at least one year immediately before the approval of your OAS pension, and
        • you had periods of prior residence in Canada that were equal to at least three times the period of absence during the 10-year period (i.e., three years of residence for every year of absence). For example, an absence of two years between the ages of 60 and 62 could be offset by six years of residence in Canada after age 18 and before age 55.

Partial pension

If you do not qualify for the full Old Age Security (OAS) pension, and do not want to wait until you do, you may qualify for a partial OAS pension.
A partial OAS pension is calculated at the rate of 1/40th of the full OAS pension for each complete year of residence in Canada after age 18.
The minimum period of residence in Canada you need to qualify for a partial OAS pension is 10 years after your 18th birthday (as long as you reside in Canada when you receive your OAS pension). For example, if you resided in Canada.

How much can I get?

The amount of your retirement pension is based on how much and how long you have contributed to the CPP at the time you apply.
In March 2013, the average monthly amount for new retirement pension (taken at age 65) was $596.66 and the maximum amount in 2013 is $1,012,50. Read more about the CPP retirement pension amounts.
The amount you get considers periods where you had zero or low earnings. A certain number of your lowest earnings years may be automatically dropped from the pension calculation under the so-called "general drop-out provision".
You should also request the "child-rearing provision" if you had zero or low earnings because you were the primary caregiver raising your children.
Keeping up with inflation: If the cost of living goes up, so does the amount of your CPP benefits. Your monthly benefits are adjusted every year based on the Consumer Price Index.

第二項: 全民退休金



Canada Pension Plan pensions and benefits - Monthly and maximum payment amounts January to December 2014
Type of pension or benefit
Average amount for new beneficiaries (July 2014)
Maximum payment amount (2014)
Retirement pension (at age 65)
$607.33
$1,038.33
$9.55
$25.96
$901.40
$1,236.35
$409.26
$567.91
$311.19
$623.00
$230.72
$230.72
$230.72
$230.72
Death benefit (maximum one-time payment)
$2,294.07
$2,500.00
Combined benefits
$798.82
$1,038.33
$1,009.71
$1,236.35

Contributions to the Canada Pension Plan

Payment dates and amounts for OAS and CPP


With very few exceptions, every person over the age of 18, who work in Canada outside of Quebec and earns more than a minimum amount ($3,500 per year) must contribute to the Canada Pension Plan (CPP). If you have an employer, you pay half the required contributions and your employer pays the other half. If you are self-employed, you make the whole contribution. No matter how often you change jobs or where you work in Canada, your contributions may help you or your family become eligible for:
At the age of 70, you no longer contribute to the CPP, even if you are still working.

Note: Quebec Pension Plan

The CPP operates throughout Canada, except in Quebec, where the Quebec Pension Plan (QPP) provides similar pensions and benefits.

How much do I contribute?

The amount you contribute is based on your employment income.
You make contributions only on your annual earnings between a minimum and a maximum amount (these are called your pensionable earnings). The minimum amount is frozen at $3,500. The maximum amount is set each January, based on increases in the average wage in Canada.
In 2013, the maximum amount is $51,100. The contribution rate on these pensionable earnings is 9.9%, split equally between you and your employer. If you are self-employed, you pay the full 9.9%. The maximum contribution for employers and employees in 2013 is $2,356.20 each.
If you are self-employed, the maximum contribution is $4,712.40. Your contributions are based on your net business income (after expenses). You do not contribute on any other type of income, such as investment earnings. If, during a year, you contributed too much or earned less than the set minimum amount, your contributions will be refunded when you file your income taxes.
Visit the Canada Revenue Agency website to find out more about CPP contribution rates, maximums and exemptions.

Why are my contributions important?

The Canada Pension Plan (CPP) uses your contributions to determine whether you and/or your family are eligible for a CPP benefit and, if so, what the amount of the benefit will be.
Important factors are how long and how much you contribute. Usually, the more you earn and contribute to the CPP in the years before you take your retirement pension, the higher the benefit will be, because you have built up more CPP pension credits.
Your CPP credits can also be affected if you divorce or separate from your spouse or if your common-law relationship ends.

How do I know that all of my contributions are accounted for?

The Canada Revenue Agency and Revenu Québec (for those working in Quebec) provide Service Canada with details on your earnings and the contributions you have made. Service Canada then keeps a record using a Statement of Contributions. You can check this statement for accuracy and contact us if you disagree with any of the figures.
You do not contribute while you are receiving a CPP Disability benefit, or during periods when you have no earnings or when your earnings are below the $3,500 minimum amount.

Note: Post-retirement benefit

If you work and make contributions while receiving your CPP retirement pension, these contributions will go toward the post-retirement benefit.

What if I lived or worked in another country?

Canada has international social security agreements with many countries. These agreements can help you qualify for pensions or benefits from either country.
For example, if you did not live or work long enough in another country to qualify under its rules, the time you spent there and the contributions you made may be added to your contributions in Canada to allow you to meet the eligibility requirements for the Canada Pension Plan pensions and benefits.

What is my contributory period and how is it used?

Your contributory period begins when you reach age 18 (or January 1, 1966, whichever is later) and ends when you either start receiving your CPP retirement pension, turn 70 or die (whichever happens earliest).
We use the contributory period to calculate the amount of CPP benefits that you may become eligible to receive.
The amount you get considers periods where you had zero or low earnings. A certain number of your lowest earnings years may be automatically dropped from the pension calculation under the so-called "general drop-out provision".
You should also request the "child-rearing provision" if you had zero or low earnings because you were the primary caregiver raising your children.

老安按:每月從工資扣9.9%,還有不是扣的多,取的多,那些高薪的,扣的多,但取的竟有上限,唉!這世界真不公平!!!還有平時的薪俸稅,購物及消費的消售稅,地稅,保險一大堆,福利國家???

另一問題,這些能令你老有所依嗎?
答案,見人見智而已,跟你算一下在加國卑詩大溫的普通人家消費!

以自有一中下價獨立平房計算: 地稅每月約二百五十,醫保(卑詩及一二省份要付,其他省份如多倫多不用付,其他稅項包含了),約一百,視符你夫婦的全年收入, 電費80,天然氣70(二項以平均計,還要很節約),房屋保險,150,電視60,電話30,汽車保險220,汽車保養跟汽油120(無車不行,公車跟香港沒法比,"落後"很多),水費環保費50及其他,你還是要有自己的積蓄才可生活得"過去"!

所以,在加國尤其卑詩,要打入政府公務員行列,公營企業,大公司,公會工種,教師等等行業,這就是"天堂"了!
原因,這些工種有多一套或多套私保福利,如"公積金","延續醫療保險(即是再加的私人保險,保公家不包的如藥費,牙醫,物理治療,有些較慷慨的連政府醫保都是保險公司付的,老鬼前曾工作的木廠,我夫婦俩曾醫療及保持牙齒及補牙,曾申保金七千多八千,可惜,美次按風波,被解散了,後再沒有找到這麼慷慨的公司及老闆了!)

照所知,多倫多即安大略省政府福利比卑詩好很多,法語省魁北克更好(不過個人入息稅最高百分五十七!!!)

最後,要說明,如是上述荀工,政府的GIS"綜援"會一筆勾消,即只能取OAS及CPP而已!

有興趣的去 Canada Service 網看一下,清楚齊備,如有包拗頸的,請勿拍我磚,加拿大各省各例,但全民退保是全聯邦的,錯不了那裡,如果閣下或你的親屬取得更好,恭喜你,咱不會眼紅,只會撞頭埋墻,自己怨自自低能而已!

閒中無事,又無眼睇佔中,但係家鄉有些人老是說加國福利如天堂,可惜老鬼身在福中不知福,唔多覺噃!因此摷的資料出嚟大家睇下!

再強調,這裡"卑詩省",每發工資除了扣9.9公資作為全民退保,還要付醫保,薪俸稅,利得稅,汽車及電費碳稅(安省多市沒有的),消費還要付12%消售稅!

家鄉人願意嗎?騎騎! 

最後,最後,不要相信我,去官方網站 Canada Service 自己溜溜,相信自己的眼睛,相信民主國家模範"加拿大"政府!!!

還有,還有,如果你怕怕北風,也討厭五毛,左膠,也極憎惡"思歪",順便看看 Canada Service ,加拿大歡迎你及你的家人,,,,移民!!!不用找顧問!!!

$1,198.58

 
$23,016 (individual income)

 







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